Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper

The charming mismatched look of a weathered scrap wood wall can be achieved with a lot less time and effort using a wood-textured wallpaper series by Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek. The patterns range from rustic barn wood stripped of white paint to time-worn cottage-style wainscoting.

Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper vintage look
Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper colorful

It’s the designer’s second collaboration with Dutch wallpaper company NLXL; the first was based on ‘waste furniture’ and came in a soft palette of pastels and creamy off-white, with individual strips looking like the legs of dismantled tables and chairs.

Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper dark
Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper natural

The new collection is even more convincing, with a matte finish that eliminates tell-tale glare. While it may not have the tactile benefits of real scrap wood, nor the sense of history, it’s a fun way to get a similar look.

“Dutch designer, Piet Hein Eek is internationally renowned for his designs using reclaimed materials. His final exam piece at the Academy for Industrial Design in Eindhoven was constructed from reclaimed wood. It caused a stir in the world of the then dominant Italian design by going against the conventions of mass production and became the inspiration for his famous SCRAPWOOD wallpaper. Piet Hein Eek has continued in his work to elevate everyday, ordinary materials into desirable design elements and to give a new lease of life to the discarded and often overlooked.”

Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood wallpaper charred

“The fashion for exposed, untreated and raw finishes is complemented perfectly with Piet Hein Eek wall paper designs. His Scrapwood series is available in various finishes to suit your colour scheme and design themes. Nautical shades combine well with ever-popular coastal themes for a beach shack look. Natural wood, or that which is painted in cool shades, fits well with minimalist Scandinavian style. Likewise, the raw, exposed finish of untreated wood sits well in an industrial setting, such as a loft apartment. The reclaimed aspect of the wood also touches on environmental themes and makes a great backdrop to elements of flora, as well as contemporary furniture.”