Treluce wavy light

Leave lighting to Treluce and they will blow your mind every time. Designer Marcus Tremonto is making a name for himself as an artist, with lights that act less like fixtures and more like one-of-a-kind installation works of site-specific light sculpture.

But it is not just about the design – technology and materials play a role too, as in this super-thin, carbon-fiber ceiling ‘chandelier’ that wraps and curves to produce lighting effects that shift at every turn.

Treluce lighting mirror

Other works are more playful, like these luminescent half-circles structured to create optical illusions – on the left, a mirror doubles the image to make the object look like a full lamp; on the right, the semi-circles are cut at an angle to make the lamp appear trapped in the wall.

Treluce for Rossana Orlandi
Treluce for Rossana Orlandi blue

Playing with topography, these lit landscape pieces tell stories of tone and texture through layers of light and dark.

Treluce lighting
Treluce lighting detail

And then there are the most abstract pieces, wall-hanging works of light art that are show the possibilities of simple LED and other string-lighting technologies to not just brighten a space but animate it as well.

“Artist/Designer Marcus Tremonto received international recognition and acclaim for his innovative work from the solo exhibition entitled “Lightworks” for Phillips De Pury and Company in the fall of 2007. Following, he was chosen for the coveted Swarovski Crystal Palace in Milan 2008 and exhibited in their first museum exhibition in London at the Design Museum in 2012.”

“In addition Marcus was chosen by Tiffany & Co. to be the first artist in the 175 year history of the company to create a unique work installation for their NY Soho store. His Limited edition objects can also be found at the Copper Hewitt Museum Shop. He exhibits internationally from Milan’s Salone del Mobile to The Pavillon des Art et du Design in Paris/London, during Frieze Art in London and Design Miami; and has designed collections for MOSS in New York. Currently his work is held in private collections, fine galleries and museums.”