hut on a roof

The innovation is not in the design, materials or systems, but in the location: HUT Architecture has transplanted a typology – the suburban garden shed – from its rural setting to the city center (in this case: London).

Hut on a roof in situ

“With a sliding glass roof, solar panels, wood-burning stove and sheep’s wool insulation the building takes ideas from both hide-away tree houses and the suburban garden shed, providing nothing more or less than is required for an urban sanctuary.”

Hut on a roof rendering

The result is a clean and modern but cozy and homey space that could be an autonomous micro-dwelling in dense urban areas, or a simple home extension leading out to a rooftop deck.

Hut on the roof interior living room view

It borrows from non-urban vernacular, but fits the context of cities quite well – we are used to seeing small outcroppings on the tops of buildings, for general roof access, storage or elevator shafts.

hut on a roof interior
Hut on the roof diagram

“Intricately designed and compact, the Hut-on-a-roof feels like an entirely timber mini-building, dropped into the Clerkenwell roof scape. With a sliding glass roof, solar panels, wood-burning stove and sheep’s wool insulation the building takes ideas from both hide-away tree houses and the suburban garden shed, to create an autonomous urban retreat and working kitchen/diner.”

“Established in 2002, HÛT is an award-winning architectural practice based in Shoreditch, London. We specialise in the design of places to live, work and play, many schemes combining all areas of expertise in urban re-invention projects.”

“The name HÛT highlights a belief that a simple, refined approach – robust, carefully considered and beautifully resolved – produces the most elegant designs. The everyday and familiar are re-imagined to produce an architecture that delights and surprises.”

“The practice has strong links with academia, including the Bartlett and Westminster University, and is a supporter of the London School of Architecture. HÛT is actively involved with the RIBA, championing better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture. ‘The primitive hut is not only the origin of built form, but is also the very personification of all that is right in architecture.'”