tree house MMP Architects

When it comes to our subjective experience of spaces, perception can change everything. Once you know you are walking in a room or on a deck lofted over empty space, you start to feel closer to the forest canopy above … and further from the sloping-away ground below.

tree house MMP Architects terrace

Three distinct pavilions are connected internally to form a single whole scaled to human occupation, not seeking to exist as a large mass amidst more slender natural growth.

tree house MMP Architects at night

Approaching the home, one is given a clear view of its relationship with the site before even entering. The dual effect of such an experience can be a combination of exhilaration at the elevation and comfort born from a sense of removal and distance.

tree house MMP Architects view
tree house MMP Architects kitechen

Inside, a sense of openness admits structural supports and overhanging shelters mimics the canopy of trees as well, providing another connection to nature. This building by MMP Architects further uses various passive strategies to help it place nice with its environment, beyond just the look and feel.

“The building ‘floats’ on a galvanized steel support structure, which carries through from the ground to the roof ensuring minimum site disturbance, low maintenance and structural integrity. Retention of most of the existing forest, combined with subdued colors has resulted in a building which is virtually invisible from the city below. However, views of the city exist through ‘windows’ in the forest.”

tree house MMP Architects pool

“Three pavilions separated by breezeways form the single level of the home suspended above the natural slope. The central living pavilion opens to the forest outlook and through a full glass wall, and also connects seamlessly to the outdoor living breezeway. Outdoor dining overlooks the slightly lower lounge ‘treehouse‘ which rests under a large canopy roof and is open on all sides. The main bedroom and ensuite pavilion is accessed across this breezeway and features framed views of the adjoining rock face which becomes a wet season cascade.”