Aaron Asedo furniture nessy lounger

This set of strange furniture is designed to fit a peculiar purpose: each part is made to seem like a piece of art, or, more specifically, a one-off artwork with a functional side to it rather than mass-produced furniture made ready to order at little notice.

Aaron Asedo furniture Loops bench

From a wide-legged wooden bench with rubber-loop cushions to a curved-wood chair and fiberglass lounger, each work by Aaron Asedo does a remarkable job of looking as much like a singular sculpture as the start of a furniture line.

Aaron Asedo furniture loops bench in use

Designed to fit into a UPS shipping box, the Loops Bench “brings modern design to knock-down furniture. Built utilizing CNC milling, over 1200 holes were drilled into PETG plastic, which allowed for the unique weave pattern. The translucent plastic, against the warm maple grain makes this piece a focal point of any room.”

Aaron Asedo furniture Palm

Palm, above, is inspired by boat construction.

“Palm was created to narrow the gap between furniture found in the studio market versus designs that are sold in mass production. The early design stage concentrated on the capabilities of steam bending and experimented with different materials. Through research, the importance of the CNC tooling was established, and transformed Palm into a modern innovation. The advances in computer 3D modeling allowed for the table to be offered at two price points; the higher price point can be milled from beech or walnut wood, and the lower price point can be milled from 3/4 sheet stock. Both materials lend themselves to different aesthetics, which are successful at both price points. Shown here is the Studio Market version.”

Nessy lounger

The Nessy Lounge Chair, believe it or not, was inspired by artichokes. “This work experimented with new materials and techniques, such as fiberglass and inlay work. This hand shaped chair carries a warm appeal, which attracts the user to engage in different sitting positions.”

Aaron Asedo furniture palm detail

Design is in the details: some have degrees of symmetry while others are entirely asymmetrical and some employ traditional construction techniques while others use highly offbeat joinery and innovative building methods.

aaron asedo oak and ink

Part of the success of this strategy lies in the avoidance of sets or series per say – each design is surprisingly different from the last in terms of form, material and overall aesthetic, thus more similar to disjunctive works of art than conjunctive or uniform parts of a whole.