Deck House

Set along a gentle slope, surrounded by trees but with unobstructed lines of sight to distant mountains … well, this landscape called for an environment-engaged solution, and these architects answered with appropriate awe and reverence for the surroundings.

Deck House Pool

Filipe Assadi is a Chilean architect with offices in Mexico and New York, and has an approach and style that reflect these regional influences. This particular Deck House is at once modern and contextual – a contemporary-shaped core clad in weathered local wood that unfolds down the hill.

Deck House glass facade
Deck House Swimming

Raised slightly off the ground but without a surrounding railing, residents enjoying the extensive porch (and built-in pool) are at once removed from but connected to the adjacent arid sand-and-forest setting.

Deck House Timber Facade
Deck House Glass Living Room
Deck House dining area

Inside, floor-to-ceiling glass provides a three-sided view (and easy child supervision) back out from the primary living room, while private bedroom and bathroom spaces are tucked in back where less light is required and more seclusion desired.

“The sight towards the location of Rungue, displayed as a plane inclined looking the valley, having the Coast mountain range as background. The land suggested a large terrace, a platform from which it is possible to admire the overall scenery.”

Deck House light and shadow

“The project starts having in mind a deck of wood. Over this platform would be incorporated the different areas of the house. Nevertheless, the resources were exclusively aimed at this terrace, and the interior space was enough only for a large living area incorporated to this terrace. It was decided, therefore, to assign almost all these resources to resolve the housing based on two main components: a deck and a living area, being this later one capable of absorbing the kitchen, the dinning room, and even the master bedroom. Additionally, considering that in a summer holiday house dormitories are only used to sleep, it was decided to eliminate this concept, changing it for ‘a group sleeping area at which the space aimed at dormitories almost fully disappears from the project.'”